Homemade Whipped Body Butter (+bonus printable guide & recipes!)

Learn how to make homemade whipped body butter using all natural ingredients.

We’ll cover the basics of making a simple body butter formula, expected shelf life and storage tips, some carrier oil and essential oil options, plus troubleshooting tips if your body butter turns out too greasy, grainy, soft, or hard.

As a bonus, you can grab all of this information + extra tips & tricks + even more formulas & recipes packaged up in a handy printable free guide: All Natural Body Butters. (More on that below!)

a jar of homemade whipped body butter surrounded by fresh flowers
You’ll learn how to make light, fluffy, non-greasy body butters in this article!

Body butter recipes, FAQS, troubleshooting tips, and more!

I get a lot of questions about making homemade body butters, especially this time of year when dry indoor air leaves our skin feeling parched.

To help answer every type of question I’ve gotten over the years, I finally got around to assembling it all into this ‘ultimate guide to making body butters’ kind of blog post. However, it turned out to be too much information to fit neatly into one article, and still include extra recipes and herbal infusion techniques, so I also created a companion eBook with expanded information + more recipes to explore.

If there’s something I didn’t cover in the article or the guide, leave a comment below and I’ll be happy to help!

Some links on this site are affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, I may earn a small commission for sending a customer their way.

jar of body butter surrounded by fresh calendula and chamomile
This body butter is infused with calendula, chamomile, and dandelions. (See the free bonus guide below: All Natural Body Butters, for information on infusing herbs into your creations!)

Before we start, let’s make sure we’re on the same page.

What’s a whipped body butter?

A body butter is a thick fluffy cream-like product that helps nourish and protect your skin from dryness.

When I say whipped body butter, I’m referring to a product made with:

  • a cosmetic butter, or butters, of some type (shea, mango, cocoa, etc)
  • carrier oils (examples are rice bran, sunflower, jojoba, olive, grapeseed, etc)
  • (sometimes) skin-loving herbs, such as calendula, dandelion, etc
  • (sometimes) essential oils, for scent

Every so often, you’ll see a recipe described as a body butter, but it will have a water based ingredient in it (water, hydrosol, aloe, herbal tea.) While those can be lovely to use, I consider them more of a cream, since once you add these water based things, you’ll need to start thinking about preservatives.

Today, we’re talking about body butters made only with oils and butters – nothing water based, so you won’t need to worry about adding preservatives.

Whipped body butters are also sometimes called waterless creams.

body butter surrounded by fresh mint leaves and forget me not flowers
hemp-infused body butter from the Aches & Pains eBook set

Whipped Body Butter Recipe & Variations

This basic recipe can be used as a template to make all sorts of unique body butters! You’ll find a few personalization ideas below, and even more ideas and formulas in the All Natural Body Butters Guide you can grab later in this article.

It’s a simple formula that makes a thick and rich waterless cream (body butter) that tends to get more solid at cooler temperatures, so you may need to slightly adjust the amount of oils to best suit your climate/room temperature.

For a softer product in cold weather or cold houses, try increasing the amount of oil by 1/4 ounce (7 grams) and adjust upwards from there. In hot climates, you may need to decrease the oil amount to keep it from being too soft.

Also be sure to check out the tips below for choosing non-greasy oils – to ensure your body butter doesn’t turn out too oily feeling!

You can find this same recipe on page 21 of your free All Natural Body Butters Guide listed as: Formula 1: Mango or Shea Butter + Oils

jar of lavender body butter
The Lavender Shea Body Butter recipe on this website was made using the formula below.

Mango or Shea Butter + Oils Formula

This formula is super simple – you only need to choose a type of butter, and types of oil to use.

Mango butter absorbs into your skin slightly faster than shea butter, so it’s a good choice if you’re trying to make a lighter feeling body butter. Mango butter is also especially nice for dry or damaged skin.

Shea butter is super nourishing, especially for those with dry skin, eczema, itchy skin, or such. However, it does have a heavier feel and it’s most prone to getting grainy. (See the troubleshooting section below for tips if you experience graininess.) The scent of raw shea butter can be overwhelming, so refined shea butter if most often used in body butters.

I have successfully made this formula with other butters though – see below for a few substitution tips.

Check the oils section below, and choose the oils you’d like for your project. (I love a blend of about 3/4 rice bran oil or apricot kernel oil and 1/4 fractionated coconut oil, but feel free to get creative in your choices!)

Yield: This recipe makes 7.5 oz (213 g) of body butter by weight, but whips up to fill 2 or 3 four-ounce jars

bowl of whipped body butter
A 4-cup Pyrex or heat-proof glass measuring pitcher is perfect for making body butters!

Equipment Needed

  • a kitchen scale that measures in ounces or grams
  • a wide-mouth pint canning jar or other heatproof container for melting the butter and oil together
  • a small saucepan or pot to place the melting jar/container in
  • a 4-cup pyrex measuring pitcher, or other heatproof tall narrow mixing container or bowl
  • a hand mixer (or stand mixer)
  • 2 or 3 four-ounce jars

Ingredients

  • 5 oz (142 g) mango butter or shea butter
  • 2.5 oz (71 g) liquid carrier oils of your choice (see below for non-greasy options)
  • 0.25+ oz (7+ g) extra oil, if needed to mix in to make a softer texture
  • up to 45 drops (or 1 g) essential oils, optional (a 1% dilution rate – use less for a softer scent)

Substitution Tips

Mango or shea butter can be replaced with:

  • Cupuacu Butter (+ more oil) – You’ll need a lot more oil for this variation. Start by adding an extra 70 g of liquid oil when melting all of the ingredients together; you may need to add even more additional oil when whipping if it feels too stiff.
  • Avocado Butter (+ less oil) – For this sub, you don’t need as much oil. A good ratio is 5.6 oz (159 g) avocado butter + 1.4 oz (40 g) liquid oils.

Instructions

  1. Weigh the butter and oils into a heatproof jar.
  2. Set the jar into a pan containing several inches of water, forming a double boiler setup.
  3. Place the pan over a medium low burner until the butter completely melts.
  4. Remove the jar from the heat and pour the hot mixture into a tall narrow mixing container, like a 4-cup Pyrex measuring pitcher.
  5. Place in the refrigerator to cool, about 35 to 55 minutes, or until it turns opaque and develops a solid layer on top.
  6. You want the chilled mixture to be on the more solid side, but not rock hard.
  7. Using a hand mixer, beat for a minute, then add essential oils, if using.
  8. Continue whipping until light and fluffy.
  9. If the butter seems too stiff while mixing, blend in more oil, about 1/4 ounce (7 g) at a time.
  10. You can scoop into containers right away, but for a fluffier butter – cover the butter and let it sit overnight and rewhip it with your mixer the next day, adding more oil if needed to make it a lighter consistency, then fill into containers.
  11. Some mixers will make a fluffier and lighter product than others, but this recipe should fill about 2 to 3 four-ounce jars.
jar of whipped body butter with dried calendula flowers
Your creations can be personalized with different herbs, essential oils, and additives, to create a variety of unique combinations!

Recipe Variation Ideas

  1. Calendula Butter: Use calendula infused oil for the oil portion. Optionally add 15 drops of lavender essential oil when mixing. Leave out the essential oil and it can be used on all ages, even pets (ie: for hot spots).
  2. Zinc Oxide ‘Cream’: Add 2 to 4 grams (1/2 to 1 teaspoon) zinc oxide powder to the melted mixture before chilling. Proceed and mix according to directions.
  3. Rosehip Waterless Cream: Replace 0.4 oz (11 g) of the oils with rosehip seed oil. Since it’s heat sensitive, wait to add the rosehip oil until after you removed the melted mixture from the heat. Optional essential oils: 10 drops rose absolute, 10 drops lavender, 1 drop frankincense
  4. Lightly tinted body butter: Try adding 1/4 to 1/2 tsp rose clay or purple Brazilian clay. Add the smaller amount first, mix well, then decide if you need a little more. (Keep in mind that clay may be too drying for ultra-dry skin types.)
  5. Your turn! Mix and match the oil types, and try some herbal infused oils (such as plantain, or rose, or dandelion.) Try different essential oils for scent and skin benefits!

Recipe Tips

If you live in a hot climate and the body butter is too soft/melty, you may need to melt the butter down again and add a small amount (start with a tablespoon or two) of melted hard butter, such as cocoa (use refined, if you don’t want the chocolate smell), kokum butter, or tucuma butter, or even a small amount of melted beeswax (try starting with about 1/2 tsp pastilles for every 6 to 8 ounces of ingredients). Cool, then whip again and check the texture.

If you live in a cold climate or your house stays cool, you may wake up the next day to find your body butter has solidified overnight, and is harder than you’d like. If your body butter seems too firm or stiff the next day, scrape it out of the containers and try whipping it again, beating in an extra 1/4 ounce (7 g) of oil at a time, until it’s a texture you like.

I don’t recommend using regular coconut oil in this recipe. It becomes liquid over 76 degrees F, but hard at cooler temperatures, making it unreliable for consistency. Also, regular coconut oil is heavy on your skin, and will make your body butter feel more greasy.

Body butters are adaptable! You can melt them down again a few times until you get the balance of butters and oils just right for your preferences and climate!

a group of glass bowls filled with several differently colored oils beside a bowl of fresh rosehips and a pile of fresh green herbs
Choose the right liquid oils so your body butter doesn’t feel too greasy or oily.

What Oils to Use in Body Butter

One of the most common complaints about body butter is that it can feel too heavy, oily, or greasy on your skin. To some extent, body butters are going to be naturally rich – because they’re made with butters and oils, and there’s no water to ‘lighten them up’!

However, the type of liquid oil you choose can make a huge difference in how your body butter feels on your skin.

Even if you have a favorite body butter recipe you already like, but it’s a little bit too heavy/greasy for your tastes, you can substitute lighter oils for one or more of the heavier oils in your recipe.

Heavy Oils (use less of these, combine with light oils)

Heavy oils are ones that take a longer time to sink into your skin. They might be nice for very dry skin types, but they’ll make your body butter feel heavier and soak into your skin more slowly.

However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use them at all. Some of the best oils for eczema, psoriasis, and super dry/sensitive skin are heavy oils.

If a less oily-feeling body butter is important to you, you just want to combine these heavy oils with something ultra non-greasy, such as fractionated coconut oil (the kind that’s still liquid when cold) or grapeseed oil, or one of the other lighter oils listed below.

Heavy oils include:

  • olive oil
  • coconut oil (the kind that gets solid when it’s chilled)
  • wheat germ oil
  • macadamia oil
  • tamanu oil (nice in tiny amounts)
  • avocado oil
  • castor oil
bowl of calendula oil with fresh flowers
Choose light, non-greasy oils for a lighter, less-oily-feeling body butter.

Lighter Oils (use all or mostly these)

Lighter oils are ones that soak into your skin more quickly. They are good oils to put in body butter to make it feel less oily and greasy.

Lighter oils include:

  • grapeseed oil
  • fractionated coconut oil (the kind that stays liquid when it’s chilled)
  • jojoba oil
  • rosehip seed oil
  • rice bran oil
  • apricot kernel oil
  • argan oil
  • hazelnut oil
  • safflower oil

There are also some medium oils – they absorb into your skin more quickly than heavy oils, but might take a little longer than lighter oils. These include sweet almond oil, hemp seed oil, chia seed oil, kukui nut oil, and pumpkin seed oil. It’s good to combine these with a lighter oil too!

(You can find a much more extensive list of oils, their properties, types of skin they benefit, and absorbency rates in my Handmade Lotions & Creams eBook Collection.)

Essential Oils
You can naturally scent your homemade body butters with essential oils.

Essential Oils

Essential oils will add natural fragrance and skin benefits to your homemade products.

Here are a few that do nicely in body butter:

  • Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) – gentle and calming herbaceous floral scent, used as a general panacea for skin conditions
  • Sweet Orange Essential Oil (Citrus × sinensis) – a fresh, cheerful, uplifting scent
  • Peppermint (Mentha × piperita) – minty refreshing scent that energizes and cools
  • Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) – for an inexpensive rose-like scent, often used for wrinkles, mature or damaged skin
  • Cedarwood Himalayan (Cedrus deodara) – soft pleasing woodsy scent, replaces Cedarwood Atlas, which is a threatened species
  • Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) – uplifting & relaxing, use bergaptene-free versions (see below)
sweet orange essential oil
Sweet orange essential oil is sun safe and smells great in body butters!

Phototoxic Essential Oils

A few citrus essential oils can make your skin more sensitive to the sun. These are called phototoxic oils and are generally avoided in leave on products or are highly diluted.

Not all citrus oils are phototoxic though!

Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), cold pressed Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis), and cold pressed Tangerine (Citrus reticulata) are sun safe and fine to use your body butters.

Phototoxic oils to avoid or use with caution in daytime skin care products:

  • Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) – regular bergamot is not sun safe, but look for brands labeled bergaptene-free or furanocoumarin-free, which are fine to use
  • Grapefruit (Citrus x paradise) – use in limited amounts, 4% dilution max
  • Lemon (Citrus limon) – cold pressed is phototoxic, steam distilled is okay
  • Lime (Citrus aurantifolia) – cold pressed is phototoxic, steam distilled is okay
essential oil bottles surrounded by fresh flowers and leaves
Check out my Essential Oil Dilution Chart article to learn how much essential oil to use when making lip balm, bath bombs, body butters, salves, and other skin care products.

How Much EO to Use

How much essential oil can you use in body butters?

I like to use about 0.5 to 1% usage rate.

To easily figure out essential oil amount by drops:

  • Add up the weight of the ingredients in your recipe.
  • For example, if your body butter ingredients weigh 7 oz (200 grams.)
  • Pull up my helpful Essential Oils Dilution Chart for Skin Care Products.
  • Look on the row for 7 ounces of product.
  • It will say to use 21 drops of essential oil for 0.5% usage rate, or 42 drops for a 1% usage rate.

Alternatively, to figure out the amount by weight:

  • Add up the weight of the ingredients in your recipe.
  • It’s MUCH easier to convert the weight to grams first. (Use Google search for this — just type in something like: 7 ounces to grams — and it will do the math for you!)
  • Multiply the total weight by 0.005 (for 0.5% rate) or by 0.01 (for 1% rate).
  • If the weight is 7 oz (200 grams), you could add 1 gram essential oil for the 0.5% rate (200 grams x 0.005 = 1) all the way up to 2 grams for the 1% rate. (200 grams x 0.01 = 2)
inside view of two pages from the all natural body butters guide

Get your All Natural Body Butters Guide here!

As mentioned above, I have more body butter information, formulas, and recipes than I could easily share in this one article, so I packaged it all up into a free printable guide I’m giving to anyone who is interested!

Sign up to my Things to Make Thursdays email list and I’ll send it to you at no charge.

(I send newsletters every few weeks with my best seasonal projects: useful things to make with flowers and herbs, natural skin care recipes, and remedies. I promise to never spam or overwhelm, and you can unsubscribe at any time.)

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ALL NATURAL BODY BUTTERS

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  • Tips and troubleshooting advice.

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Body Butter Ipad

What’s the shelf life of DIY body butter?

Since body butter doesn’t contain water-based ingredients, the shelf life is as long as the oils and butters in the recipe. Body butter won’t mold or get spoiled, but the oils in it can eventually go rancid. You’ll know that your body butter is expired if it starts smelling like old oil.

As a general rule of thumb, it’s good to try to use your body butters up within 6 to 9 months. They will slowly deflate over time, but you can easily fluff them back up with your mixer again.

Body butters are popular gifts, just remember how they deflate over time, so don’t make them up *too* far in advance. I like to make them up the week before I gift them, and keep them in a fairly cool room until ready to share.

Store your body butters in a room that keeps pretty even temperatures. (A bathroom is not the best place.) If the room temperature is comfortable for you to stay in, it’s probably comfy for your skin care products too.

You do not need to keep body butters in the fridge, unless you live in an ultra-hot climate, then it might be helpful.

Do you have to use a preservative in body butter?

As I mentioned above, you do not need to add a preservative to body butter! Preservatives fight bacteria and mold, which shouldn’t be a problem as long as water isn’t introduced.

Antioxidants

You may want to add an antioxidant though. Antioxidants are ingredients that help keep oils from going rancid too quickly. (They won’t help with mold or bacteria, so they’re not considered preservatives.)

Antioxidants for body butter include Vitamin E or Rosemary Antioxidant. I don’t usually add these, since we use body butter up before it gets too old, but if I do, I either squeeze the contents of a vitamin E capsule (or 1/4 tsp vitamin E oil) into the melted oils, after removing from heat, or add 4 to 6 drops rosemary antioxidant.

calendula infused whipped body butter
a jar of calendula infused body butter

Troubleshooting Body Butter Problems

Here are some of the most common problems you might run into when making body butter.

Why does my body butter feel greasy?

Since it’s made up of only oils and butters, body butter will naturally be rich and heavy. It will never feel like a cream made with water, or absorb in as quickly. (Check out my Handmade Lotions & Creams eBook collection for lots about making those!)

The best way to lighten up a body butter or waterless cream is to use the lightest, most non-greasy oils possible.

You can almost always improve a body butter by including about 25% of the oils as fractionated coconut oil. (Example: The recipe needs 4 ounces of oils total, then 1 ounce of that would be fractionated coconut oil.)

While changing up oils and fine-tuning your recipe will help the most, you can also try adding 1 to 2 tsp tapioca starch, arrowroot powder, or cornstarch to your body butter. (But try adjusting the oils first.)

Many popular body butter recipes contain coconut oil (the kind that’s solid at cold temperatures), but it absorbs into your skin slowly and will make your body butter more greasy.

My body butter is grainy:

Butters are made up of a combination of fatty acids – and they all have varying melting points. So, if you don’t completely melt the butter in your recipe, you may have missed melting some of the fatty acids with the highest melting points. They’ll show up as hard grainy bits in your finished product. (This happens with lip balms, lotion bars, and salves too.)

To keep this from happening, you want to completely melt the shea or mango butter, then cool the mixture quickly by putting it in the fridge or freezer. That way, you won’t have some partially melted bits causing troubles for you!

Another method is to not melt shea, avocado, or mango butter, but instead whip it until fluffy, then add the oil and beat that in. I’ve done that before too and it works well, IF your shea, avocado, or mango butter is soft enough to mix with a hand or stand mixing without melting. This varies widely between vendors and batches.

For body butter that’s already made and grainy, just melt it down completely, cool it rapidly in the fridge or freezer, then try whipping it again.

My body butter turned out too hard!

If your house or climate is cold, then your body butters may become too firm or hard. If that happens, just beat them with the hand mixer again, adding in about 1/4 ounce of oil at a time until you get a lighter, softer texture.

Whipped butter that’s too hard to whip with a stand or hand mixer, will need to be completely melted again. Then add in an extra 1/4 to 1/2 ounce of oil, whip until fluffy, and test to see if you need even more oil added, to get it to your preferred consistency.

My body butter is too soft, or melty!

First, make sure that you put the melted butter and oil into the fridge (or a freezer works too) to cool it until it hardens. Don’t try to mix until it has chilled to that point.

If you live in a hot climate, or your house runs hot, and all of your body butters get too soft during storage, try melting everything down and adding in a few tablespoons of melted cocoa butter (unrefined will smell like chocolate, while refined will have a much lighter scent). Cocoa butter, and other hard butters like kokum, will help harden up your body butter.

Beeswax is sometimes added to melt with the oils – you can try about 1/2 tsp grated or pastilles for every 6 to 8 ounces of butter, but be aware that some people like the feel more than others. Try a small test batch of each method and see which way you like best!

container of body butter surrounded by hot peppers and leaves
This Spicy Cypress Body Butter recipe is from my Things to Make for Aches & Pains eBook Set.

More FAQS About Making Homemade Body Butter

How do you use body butter?

Since body butters don’t contain water, they won’t add moisture to your skin. However, applying soon after a shower or bath will help lock that moisture into your skin, leaving it feeling soft and moisturized the next morning!

Body butters are rich and heavy, even when you make lighter versions, so they’re best applied sparingly to dry patches such as elbows, knees, and feet. You can smooth them over your legs and arms too, but apply lightly so you don’t end up with body butter all over your clothing or sheets!

The great thing about whipped body butters are that they’re simple to make and contain no sketchy or potentially harmful ingredients that may irritate dry or sensitive skin even further.

Do you wash off body butter?

No, you don’t need to wash body butter off after applying. Just use small amounts and give it time to soak into your skin. As mentioned above, they’re most helpful when applied after a shower or bath.

How often can you use body butter?

As often as you like! Most people apply at night, but I have some favorite body butters that I use as a hand cream during the day.

I don’t like the scent of my whipped body butter, how do I fix that?

First, you want to look into using refined butters. Unrefined shea butter especially has a strong scent that I don’t care for, so I always use the refined kind.

If you’re already made a body butter and just don’t like the scent, you can try two things:

  • First, ask around and see if any of your friends or family members like the scent. Some people love the idea of unrefined butter benefits so much, they don’t mind the scent and will happily use it.
  • If you can’t find someone to take it, make up a new batch with refined unscented butter, and slowly beat in a few spoonfuls of the original strongly scented product you made. Add the full amount of essential oils to the new batch. (Check my Essential Oils Dilution Chart for Skin Care Products or use EO Calc.) You should be able to mask the scent this way, and ‘use up’ the original smelly batch over time.
naturally color bath bombs with rose or purple clay
Naturally color body butters with rose or purple clay.

How to add color to body butter?

If you want to add a colorant to your body butter, proceed with caution! I’ve gotten panicked emails from readers who went heavy on the mica powder & accidentally stained the skin of friends & family!

If you try out a colorant, add a teeny bit, mix, then check the product by rubbing it into your skin. It’s easier to add more colorant, but not as easy of a fix if you add too much.

You can try adding a tiny amount (1/4 to 1/2 tsp) rose clay or purple Brazilian clay to tint the product, just remember that clays can be super drying for the most sensitive/dry skin types.

I’ve also experimented with French green clay and Cambrian blue clay, but the color was too murky/muddy for my tastes.

Another natural colorant idea is a few drops of sea buckthorn oil, which can add a beautiful natural yellow color that lasts a few months. (Store in dark area to maintain the color as long as possible.) Be aware that it can stain your skin as well, so be light-handed with how much you add at a time.

Can I use a blender, or an immersion blender, to make body butter?

No, you want to use a handheld mixer or stand mixer. The high amount of butter tends to clog up the blender or immersion blender and doesn’t result in a fluffy product.

jar of DIY whipped body butter surrounded by fresh flowers
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5 from 2 votes

Homemade Whipped Body Butter

Learn how to make DIY whipped body butter with natural ingredients + recipes, troubleshooting tips, plus grab a free printable guide with bonus info & recipes!
Keyword body butter, free printable guide, non-greasy
Total Time 2 hours
Servings 7.5 ounces

Equipment

  • a kitchen scale that measures in ounces or grams
  • a wide-mouth pint canning jar or other heatproof container for melting the butter and oil together
  • a small saucepan or pot to place the melting jar/container in
  • a 4-cup pyrex measuring pitcher, or other heatproof tall narrow mixing container or bowl
  • a hand mixer (or stand mixer)
  • 2 or 3 four-ounce jars

Ingredients

  • 5 oz (142 g) mango butter or shea butter
  • 2.5 oz (71 g) liquid carrier oils of your choice (choose mostly light, non-greasy oils)
  • extra oil, if needed to mix in to make a softer texture
  • 45 drops essential oil, optional (1% dilution rate, or use less for a softer scent)

Instructions

  • Weigh the butter and oils into a heatproof jar.
  • Set the jar into a pan containing several inches of water, forming a double boiler setup.
  • Place the pan over a medium low burner until the butter completely melts.
  • Remove the jar from the heat and pour the hot mixture into a tall narrow mixing container, like a 4-cup Pyrex measuring pitcher.
  • Place in the refrigerator to cool, about 35 to 55 minutes, or until it turns opaque and develops a solid layer on top.
  • You want the chilled mixture to be on the more solid side, but not rock hard.
  • Using a hand mixer, beat for a minute, then add essential oils, if using.
  • Continue whipping until light and fluffy.
  • If the butter seems too stiff while mixing, blend in more oil, about 1/4 ounce (7 g) at a time.
  • You can scoop into containers right away, but for a fluffier butter – cover the butter and let it sit overnight and rewhip it with your mixer the next day, adding more oil if needed to make it a lighter consistency, then fill into containers.
  • Some mixers will make a fluffier and lighter product than others, but this recipe should fill about 2 to 3 four-ounce jars.

Notes

Recipe Variation Ideas:

Calendula Butter: Use calendula infused oil for the oil portion. Optionally add 15 drops of lavender essential oil when mixing. Leave out the essential oil and it can be used on all ages, even pets (ie: for hot spots).
Zinc Oxide ‘Cream’: Add 2 to 4 grams (1/2 to 1 teaspoon) zinc oxide powder to the melted mixture before chilling. Proceed and mix according to directions.
Rosehip Waterless Cream: Replace 0.4 oz (11 g) of the oils with rosehip seed oil. Since it’s heat sensitive, wait to add the rosehip oil until after you removed the melted mixture from the heat. Optional essential oils: 10 drops rose absolute, 10 drops lavender, 1 drop frankincense
Lightly tinted body butter: Try adding 1/4 to 1/2 tsp rose clay or purple Brazilian clay. Add the smaller amount first, mix well, then decide if you need a little more. (Keep in mind that clay may be too drying for ultra-dry skin types.)
Your turn! Mix and match the oil types, and try some herbal infused oils (such as plantain, or rose, or dandelion.) Try different essential oils for scent and skin benefits!
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8 Comments

  1. What a wonderful gift to find in my in-box! You never disappoint! I read your posts like a desert traveller discovering a lush oasis!

  2. I have been looking for you for a while. So glad you are ok and had no issues with the flu . Can’t wait to look at the new book.
    I have a question, a friend wants a vanilla scent. Should I use real vanilla ( at least 90% vodka) or EO?

    1. Hi Karen, So good to see you here! ❤ I’m doing well, just got distracted working on my other website. 😊
      Vanilla made with vodka will separate out of the oils, so your best bet is vanilla essential oil.
      It has gotten super pricey though! You might want to look into plant based fragrance oils – they’re made from isolated plant compounds (no synthetics) – From Nature with Love has one that’s vanilla based: https://www.fromnaturewithlove.com/soap/plant-based-fragrance-oils.asp

  3. 5 stars
    So I added a FO and the scent was very weak in final stage can I rewhip with different FO or how should I fix this issue?

    1. Hi Ariel! Yes, you can rewhip body butter at any time, adding in more fragrance, or even other oils.
      I would check the vendor site where you got your fragrance oil from and see how much they recommend to add to products.
      Then see how much they recommend to use for the new fragrance oil.
      You don’t want to overload the total amount of fragrance oils combined so the finished product doesn’t risk irritating your skin, but it sounds like adding more fragrance could be a good idea!

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