How to Make a Ginger Tincture

How to Make a Ginger Tincture

A ginger tincture is easy to make and is wonderful for treating:

  • nausea
  • motion sickness
  • stomach flu
  • congestion
  • chills

Because it’s concentrated, you only need a few drops at a time to be effective, making it much easier to dose to a person reluctant to swallow anything. I find that mixing a few drops into a glass of ginger ale, or a spoonful of honey, makes patient compliance much higher!

While ginger is an excellent home remedy that’s completely safe for many people, if you are: on prescription medications (especially blood thinners), pregnant, or nursing; check with a medical professional before treating your symptoms with this or any other herbal preparation.

 

How to Make a Ginger Tincture

To make this tincture you will need:

  • ginger
  • high proof alcohol (such as vodka or brandy)

 

For the ginger, you can use either powdered (like you buy in a spice section of a store) or chopped dried root or chopped fresh root. I buy my dried ginger from either Mountain Rose Herbs or the Bulk Herb Store (affiliate links) for substantial savings and unparalleled freshness, but you may be able to find a high quality, organic brand at your local health store as well. Fresh ginger root is often found in the produce section of your local supermarket.

No precise amounts are given in this recipe, because it’s completely determined by how much ginger you have on hand.

If using dried spice: Fill a jar about 1/4 full with your ginger. Pour vodka (or brandy) over it until you have almost filled the jar. Cap, shake and store in a cool, dark place for several weeks, shaking periodically. After 4 to 6 weeks, strain and store your ginger tincture. The shelf life of this tincture is at least one to two years, if not longer.

If using fresh root: Fill a jar roughly 1/2 to 3/4 way full with your chopped ginger. Pour vodka or brandy over top, until the jar is almost filled. Place a cap on the jar, shake well and store in a dark cabinet for around two weeks, shaking periodically. After two to three weeks, strain and store your finished ginger tincture in a cool, dark place. Shelf life is a year, or longer.

You can buy a variety of tincture bottles and other containers from Mountain Rose Herbs.

 

Dosing:

The general recommended dosage for adults is up to three dropperfuls, three times a day, with children receiving half of that suggested dose. However, I find it powerful enough to only need to dose my children about three drops at a time, scattered throughout the day as needed (though one or two doses usually does the trick.) So, be sure to start with a lower dose and see how that does first.

 

Remember: This is a great home remedy for the occasional case of queasiness or stomach bug, but if you develop persistent symptoms or serious signs of illness, you should seek the advice of your doctor or other health care provider.

Some links on this site may be affiliate links. That means if you click on them and buy something, I will earn a small commission. This is at no extra charge to you, but does help support this web site. (Thank you!)

 

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7 Responses to How to Make a Ginger Tincture

  1. EcoYogini says:

    Oh this sounds lovely!
    I have a question though- would the fresh ginger result in a higher likely hood of going bad more quickly, since the “fresh” means it has water? Or is that negated by the alcohol?

  2. sounds delicious
    can’t wait to try it.

  3. Jae says:

    A question. With ground powdered ginger, do you fill the jar as full as with dried ginger? Seems like the powdered ginger by volume would be a lot more ginger than dried ginger by volume. I’d like to use my yummy ginger I just reordered from Penzey’s. It’s my favorite. Can’t wait to try it.

    • Jan says:

      Hi Jae! That’s a great question. Yes, there is somewhat of a difference. With the dried root pieces I fill the jar about 1/4, but for the powdered spice I just add a few tablespoons per the 8 oz jars I usually mix them in (so perhaps roughly 1/8 cup?) Another thing to remember with the powder is that it tends to settle into a clump at the bottom of the jar and will need more frequent shaking. Measurements don’t have to be precise unless you’re trying to create a standardized formula that will have about the same strength each batch. Otherwise, the folksy method of a little bit of this and a little bit of that, works just great for home use. :)

  4. Monsurat Mohammed says:

    thanks for the wonderful remedies found on your web. please is there any other thing to use apart from alcohol

    • Jan says:

      Yes! You can use apple cider vinegar or vegetable glycerine (you can buy from MountainRoseHerbs.com or maybe amazon.com.)
      Either of those will work with ginger, though they extract the properties a little differently. I would probably go with using apple cider vinegar as a first choice. You can then mix it with honey to taste, when you dose it out.

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